Guerrilla Lexicon: What is wireframing?

A wireframe is a two-dimensional illustration of a page’s interface that specifically focuses on space allocation and prioritization of content, functionalities available, and intended behaviors. For these reasons, wireframes typically do not include any styling, color, or graphics. A wireframe is commonly used to lay out content and functionality on a page which takes into account user needs and user journeys. Wireframes are used early in the development process to establish the basic structure of a page before visual design and content is added.

A wireframe is a visual mockup that outlines the basic structure of your website, app, or landing page. Traditionally, a wireframe is fairly simplistic. Basic shapes and elements are used to block out where each piece of content and UI element will go.
Wireframing is a practice used by UX designers which allows them to define and plan the information hierarchy of their design for a website, app, or product. Without the distractions of colors, typeface choices or text, wireframing lets you plan the layout and interaction of your interface.

A wireframe also known as ‘skeleton’, usually is a static, low-fidelity representation of different layouts that form a product. It’s a visual representation of an interface using only simple shapes (wireframes look like they were designed with wires and that’s where the name comes from). Effective wireframes are about content placement and user flows, not visual design. Resist the urge to make them look beautiful — this will slow down future iterations and introduce more confusion during testing.

Is Wireframing necessary? The answer is: Yes, it is.
Wireframing is the foundation to the interface (UI) you will be designing later on. It helps you with the informational architecture of the product and also determines how effective the flow is. Without it, you will just be designing the interface based on trial and error.